A long time ago, in a galaxy far far away there was a country named Broadviewlandia. The name Broadviewlandia had been adopted to symbolize that country’s hopes for a new bright future, as Broadviewlandia was slowly emerging from several centuries of feudal social order. Like in many ex-feudal societies, very few books were written in Broadviewlandia and even fewer were published, and the ones that existed were limited, expansive, and beyond the reach of almost all Broadviewlanders.

On May 29, 2014 the Quill & Quire published an article with the sensational title “Why the loss of Access Copyright royalties could be devastating for educational publishers”, which advances the thesis and leads the reader to the supposedly inescapable conclusion that the decision of many educational institutions to sever their ties with Access Copyright has already wreaked havoc with publishers and will continue to be. This is a second of a series of posts in which why these thesis and conclusions do not hold up to scrutiny. Part 1 examined the main smoking gun in the Q&Q article, the claimed …

The Loss of Access Copyright Royalties and the Effect on Publishers: Sifting Fact from Fiction (Part 2) Read more »

On May 29, 2014 the Quill & Quire published an article with the sensational title “Why the loss of Access Copyright royalties could be devastating for educational publishers”. Julie Baldassi, the Q&Q staff reporter who wrote the article, advances the thesis and leads the reader to the supposedly inescapable conclusion (despite occasionally inserting words such as “perhaps” or “could”) that the decision of many educational institutions to sever their ties with Access Copyright has already wreaked havoc with publishers and will continue to be. This is a first of a series of posts in which I examine that thesis and conclusions to …

The Loss of Access Copyright Royalties and the Effect on Publishers: Sifting Fact from Fiction (Part 1) Read more »

On ordinary days, s. 77 of the Copyright, dealing with orphan works (or in the Act‘s terms “owners who cannot be located”), is probably one of those provisions that get very little attention. But as Howard Knopf reports, not only did Canada’s orphan works regime get some unusual attention during the last couple of weeks, it also stirred some heated mini-controversy at the recent Fordham IP Conference.

The Australian Law Reform Commission has finally published its long-awaited Report. This is an impressive and important report, and I am proud that I had some opportunity to contribute to it in a short submission that I made last summer. In my submission I referred to two issues that I have discussed in two recent papers: fair use, and orphan works. Therefore, I was very pleased that the Commission’s recommendations with respect of those two issues are consistent with my views. Since the Commission received more than 1000 submissions, I was even happier that the Report quoted my submission a few …

The ALRC Report on Copyright and the Digital Economy (and me) Read more »